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Other works by Proulx

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natalia:
Having bought a copy of Close Range: Wyoming Stories about a week ago, I finally started reading it today and have so far gotten through the first two stories. I have to say, she just might be my new favourite authour. Annie's style of writing "works" for me and what I've read so far shares the same undercurrent of barren, stark lonliness that drew me to BBM in the first place. The second story, "The Mud Below" was particularly moving.

My question to youuu is: has anyone here read any other work by Proulx and what did you think of it?

 :-* Nat

PS: this might be better suited for Mountain Cafe, i couldn't tell (and i'm a mod. sad, i know!). please move it if need be

greenfrog:
So far I have only read Brokeback Mountain but, I have reserved a couple of her other books at the library and I'm looking forward to reading them.

O.K ?  :D

Luv Greenfrog  ;)

tpe:

--- Quote from: natalia on Jan 17, 2006, 10:16 PM ---Having bought a copy of Close Range: Wyoming Stories about a week ago, I finally started reading it today and have so far gotten through the first two stories. I have to say, she just might be my new favourite authour. Annie's style of writing "works" for me and what I've read so far shares the same undercurrent of barren, stark lonliness that drew me to BBM in the first place. The second story, "The Mud Below" was particularly moving.

My question to youuu is: has anyone here read any other work by Proulx and what did you think of it?

 :-* Nat

PS: this might be better suited for Mountain Cafe, i couldn't tell (and i'm a mod. sad, i know!). please move it if need be

--- End quote ---

natalia. glad to hear that you are reading the stories in 'Close Range'.  I had read this collection when it first came out (I was impressed by an initial reading of Brokeback Mountain in the New Yorker).  I am most partial to this collection (more so than, say,The Shipping News), perhaps because I am partial to miniatures.  I am most curious to hear your reaction to the other stories.

Proulx does have a 'range' when it comes to these stories.  But you are right in commenting of an underlying and uncompromising starkness/loneliness.

I had meant to ask this sooner or later: I recall that the story that comes right before Brokeback in the collection is most interesting.  It is about a page in length, I believe.  The language is superb, and the images are most brutal and macabre.  I have always wondered if Proulx had a kind of thematic development in mind in the arrangement of these stories -- not so sure, though.

I think that Brokeback is a fitting end to the entire collection.  It stands by itself among these wonderful stories.   

natalia:

--- Quote from: tpe on Jan 18, 2006, 10:55 AM ---
--- Quote from: natalia on Jan 17, 2006, 10:16 PM ---Having bought a copy of Close Range: Wyoming Stories about a week ago, I finally started reading it today and have so far gotten through the first two stories. I have to say, she just might be my new favourite authour. Annie's style of writing "works" for me and what I've read so far shares the same undercurrent of barren, stark lonliness that drew me to BBM in the first place. The second story, "The Mud Below" was particularly moving.

My question to youuu is: has anyone here read any other work by Proulx and what did you think of it?

 :-* Nat

PS: this might be better suited for Mountain Cafe, i couldn't tell (and i'm a mod. sad, i know!). please move it if need be

--- End quote ---

natalia. glad to hear that you are reading the stories in 'Close Range'.  I had read this collection when it first came out (I was impressed by an initial reading of Brokeback Mountain in the New Yorker).  I am most partial to this collection (more so than, say,The Shipping News), perhaps because I am partial to miniatures.  I am most curious to hear your reaction to the other stories.

Proulx does have a 'range' when it comes to these stories.  But you are right in commenting of an underlying and uncompromising starkness/loneliness.

I had meant to ask this sooner or later: I recall that the story that comes right before Brokeback in the collection is most interesting.  It is about a page in length, I believe.  The language is superb, and the images are most brutal and macabre.  I have always wondered if Proulx had a kind of thematic development in mind in the arrangement of these stories -- not so sure, though.

I think that Brokeback is a fitting end to the entire collection.  It stands by itself among these wonderful stories.   


--- End quote ---
Almost at that story right now, I'll probably have the book finished by the night (am almost dreading reading BBM as I don't know how emotionally impaired I can be tonight as I have a test to study for  :-\).
It's interesting that you pointed out Proulx's arrangement of the stories; as the book goes on they seem to get more jarring, more desperate and more filled with out and out tragedy (as opposed to a vague cloud of lonliness hanging over the entire story) Also, did you notice that almost all of her main characters tend to be males?

tpe:

--- Quote from: natalia on Jan 19, 2006, 10:21 PM ---Almost at that story right now, I'll probably have the book finished by the night (am almost dreading reading BBM as I don't know how emotionally impaired I can be tonight as I have a test to study for  :-\).
It's interesting that you pointed out Proulx's arrangement of the stories; as the book goes on they seem to get more jarring, more desperate and more filled with out and out tragedy (as opposed to a vague cloud of lonliness hanging over the entire story) Also, did you notice that almost all of her main characters tend to be males?

--- End quote ---

I TOTALLY agree with your observation, natalia!  In fact, by the time you get to 'Brokeback Mountain' at the end of the collection, you feel completely helpless and powerless.  It comes like a great wave that finally engulfs you after enduring a long and powerful storm.

As for all the main characters being males, perhaps it is her own projection of a male-dominated rural Wyoming.  But I must admit that some of the female characters are truly (sometimes gruesomely) unforgettable! 

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